Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

sexualised violence

‘Revenge Porn’ Is A Form Of Sexual Assault by @McGlynnClare

Actor Mischa Barton has become the latest in the long line of victims of what is commonly known as ‘revenge porn’. Her ex-partner secretly filmed her engaged in sexual activity and has been touting the videos for sale. Bravely speaking out about her experiences, Mischa said “I came forward to fight this, not only for myself but more »

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Contributory negligence

This news blog entry is by a former professional journalist who often expresses right-wing views. In this article, she makes it clear that she feels that a rape victim was partly responsible for the crime committed against her (“A woman who had been allowed to get very drunk inside Misty’s was dragged into bushes along more »

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Remembering Jill Saward

Last week, activist and campaigner Jill Saward died. Saward, who was raped by multiple perpetrators in 1986, was the first British woman to waive anonymity in order to campaign for better support and treatment of victims of sexualised violence, media accountability, and better training for juries. Our thoughts are with her family and friends at more »

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The @BBC remain incapable of correctly identifying child rape.

This is the brief complaint we have submitted to the BBC over an article entitled: “Outrage over 60-day jail term for sex with young daughter”. The BBC limits the number of characters that can be used in a complaint.   The title of your article is “Outrage over 60-day jail term for sex with young daughter”. more »

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Anonymity for accused in rape trials serves only to protect rapists

Giving suspects anonymity  in crimes of rape and other forms of sexualised violence is antithetical to a victim-centred justice system. There is no legal or ethical defence that justifies anonymity for suspects in rape cases and every evidence that anonymity serves only to protect rapists from the criminal justice system. You only have to examine the more »

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The Ched Evans case shows why we must start talking about consent by @sianushka

There’s a lot to be said about the Ched Evans case: its cultural significance, the legal wrangling around using a woman’s sexual history as evidence, the impact it has had and could have on a woman’s willingness to report rape, the list goes on. But perhaps most importantly it revealed a lot about our attitudes more »

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The Ched Evans case puts rape reform back 30 years by @rapecrisisscot

We were shocked and horrified to see the use of such blatantly prejudicial sexual history evidence in the Ched Evans retrial. Like Scotland, England and Wales has legislation in place to restrict defence lawyers using evidence of a rape complainer’s sexual history; however as with Scotland, the English/Welsh legislation does not ban the use of more »

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The Trump revelations show how much women are expected to ignore by @EvaWiseman

Tweet me your first assaults,” wrote Kelly Oxford after the Trump tape leaked. “I’ll go first: Old man on city bus grabs my ‘pussy’ and smiles at me, I’m 12.” By Sunday the trickle of responses had become a stream, a river, the sea. Soon there were millions of women telling stories, often stories they’d never told anyone more »

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We cannot allow the courts to judge rape by sexual history by @VeraBaird

The footballer Ched Evans had much to say following his rape acquittal, and the weekend newspapers gave him a platform to say it. Now rape campaigners must come to terms with the legacy of his case. By clearing the way for two men to tell the jury they’d had sex with the complainant, the court of more »

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