Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

sexual violence

Why ‘upskirting’ needs to be made a sex crime, by Clare McGlynn & Erika Rackley

It started with one woman, Gina Martin, being prepared to put her head above the parapet and say: this is unacceptable and should clearly be a criminal offence. Martin was a victim of the practice known commonly as “upskirting” – the taking of a photo or video up a woman’s skirt without her permission. When more »

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Theo and the distinctly sexual flavour of French racism by @KGuilaine

Content warning: contains detailed descriptions of sexual abuse On 2 February, a 22-year-old black French man named Theo was allegedly violently raped with a police truncheon, gang assaulted and racially abused by four French police officers in the Parisian suburb of Aulnay-sous-Bois. So severe were the anal injuries sustained by Theo that he needed major more »

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No, wives ‘withholding sex’ are not to blame for male violence by Laura Bates

Wives who don’t have enough sex with their husbands are partly to blame for men committing sexual assault, according to an articlepublished by the Daily Mail. The writer, Dr Catherine Hakim, claims that “decent” husbands whose wives “starve” them of sex are driven to affairs and “forced to seek relief elsewhere”, resulting in “a profoundly negative more »

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16 ways to End Violence against Women and Girls

The International Day for the Eliminations of Violence against Women kicks off 16 days of global activism. Here are 16 ways that individuals can participate and support these global campaigns against structural and systemic violence against women and girls. 1. Donate £1 to a different national campaigns and specialist women’s service like Rape Crisis England Wales, Scottish more »

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The case of Nate Parker: on rape culture in Hollywood

Nate Parker is an American actor, director, producer, and writer. His new film The Birth of a Nation premiered at Sundance Film Festival in January. Within days of the film festival, news of Parker’s involvement in a multiple perpetrator rape whilst attending Penn State, in which he was found not guilty, began to make the rounds of social more »

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The reporting of India Chipchase’s murder shows the true extent of Britain’s rape culture by @sarahditum

What did the media see in her that made her the perfect victim? The grotesque answer is, the same things as the man who murdered her did. Why India Chipchase? For the Sun, it must have been the booze: “Woman ‘drank six Jagerbombs in ten minutes on the night she was raped and murdered” went the more »

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When it comes to sexual violence and alcohol, we need to focus on the perpetrator by Dr Bianca Fileborn

The association between alcohol and sexual violence has reared its head again in a spate of recent cases and subsequent public discussion. Most prominently, the Brock Turner case has brought our attention to alcohol consumption by both the victim and the perpetrator, while the Hunting Ground documentary has put a spotlight on the pervasive occurrence of sexual violence in more »

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Why violence against women in film is not the same as violence against men by Noah Berlatsky

Whenever you mention that a piece of art shows violence against women, you can be sure that the comments section will reply, with confused gusto, “What about the men?!” Men get shot in movies too, after all; why doesn’t anyone complain about that? Hurting men, the argument goes, should negate hurting women. As long as more »

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Dani Mathers and the reality of intimate images shared without consent

By now, everyone will have heard of the incident in which model Dani Mathers took an image of a naked woman in a gym without permission and posted it on her SnapChat with the caption “If I can’t unsee this then you can’t either”. The media went with the headline ‘body shaming” when they first started covering the more »

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Rape Culture and “Twenty Minutes of Action” by Julian Vigo

Rape culture is a term coined by feminists in the 1970s which designates not only how females are vulnerable to sexual violence at the hands of males, but which speaks to the depth at which such violence is normalised. Quite often this term is met with ridicule in social media because for many, bitching about more »

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