Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

sexual harassment

Man arrested for racially-aggravated sexual assault. BBC headline gets confused with a carry-on film.

Due to the limited number of characters allowed by the BBC informal complaints, we have sent the following about the conviction of city lawyer Alistair Main:   Alistair Main has been convicted of one count of racially-aggravated assault and one of sexual assault. You minimise his criminal act of racialised sexual violence in your headline more »

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In the news – sexual harassment in the workplace and femicide

Sussex University failed duty of care to assault victim, inquiry finds by David Batty The University of Sussex failed in its duty of care to a student who was assaulted by a lecturer, taking only the perpetrator’s account of their relationship into account when assessing the risk he posed, according to an independent inquiry. The report comes more »

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In the News

What lies beneath prostitution policy in New Zealand? by Maddy Coy and Pala Molisa at  openDemocracy Prostitution and trafficking are increasingly contested in international human rights and policy forums, with debates polarised around the question of whether the prostitution system entrenches institutionalised male dominance, or if its harm grows out of associated criminality and stigma. In April 2016 more »

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‘All day, everyday’: where is the protection against violence in schools and universities?

Women all over the world have used human rights law, whether domestic or in the international treaties, to challenge their Governments when they were not recognizing and respecting women’s human rights. Women lawyers have over decades used the core human rights treaties creatively to show governments that women’s bodies, freedom and dignity are as entitled more »

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In the News (5.12) – rape culture and racialised misogyny

A long road: domestic violence law in China by Yuan Feng at openDemocracy … Now we face the challenge of making the law work to prevent violence, ensure duty bearers respond and hold perpetrators to account, at the same time as supporting survivors.  The law permits police to issue a warning, provided the violence reaches a more »

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Men’s intrusion: rethinking street harassment by Fiona Vera-Gray

To capture the impact of ‘street harassment’ on women’s sense of self, we may need to rethink our language to better fit the lived experience. … Attention to women’s experiences of intrusive men in public space is having something of a resurgence. Traditionally one of the most understudied yet commonly experienced forms of violence against women, more »

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Follow up to – you blamed the wrong person

Follow up to my post earlier this year. http://everydayvictimblaming.com/personal-experiences/you-blamed-the-wrong-person/ I decided to fight back. My company sacked me in May. He was never even suspended, despite admitting sending me a picture of his erection. My employer said that is not sexual harassment as he said I asked for it. Financially it has almost destroyed me more »

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The Trump revelations show how much women are expected to ignore by @EvaWiseman

Tweet me your first assaults,” wrote Kelly Oxford after the Trump tape leaked. “I’ll go first: Old man on city bus grabs my ‘pussy’ and smiles at me, I’m 12.” By Sunday the trickle of responses had become a stream, a river, the sea. Soon there were millions of women telling stories, often stories they’d never told anyone more »

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You can’t escape your past, but you can walk away from victim blaming (content note for graphic depictions of rape)

I had just turned 16 when it first happened. I was unpopular, the first girl to develop curves I only understood years later were just hallmarks of womanhood and not obesity, and while I was good at school, I wasn’t going to win any academic scholarships any time soon. This was all very disappointing to more »

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