Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

male violence

Supervised Visitation Hurting Children Helping Abusers: Erring on the Side of Risking Children

Our campaign was founded in response to media coverage of two events: The ‘Oxford gang case’ in which vulnerable girls were blamed for the sexual exploitation and the murder of Matthew and Carla Stevenson by their father on the very first unsupervised contact he had been given because of his long history of violence against more »

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Survivors Voices

The importance of survivors voices and thinking about ‘dual roles’ (survivors who are professionals) The book Not My Shame is available here. Inspired by our participation with the Write to End Violence Against Women awards organised by Zero Tolerance, we are now collecting examples of good journalism about domestic and sexual violence and abuse to make it clear more »

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catalyst for change by @northern_thirty

How can we use investigations into Jimmy Savile and grooming gangs as a catalyst for change? Please watch   The book Not My Shame is available here. Download this post as PDF? Click here

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In the news: rape culture and male violence

‘Pull it out, take it off, put it back in’: A man explains why he stealths women by@rachel_hosie Stealthing – the act of non-consensually removing a condom during sex – has been the subject of much discussion since a study into the act was published last month. Rape Crisis have condemned stealthing as a sex crime, and this more »

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General Election 2017: The importance of tactical voting to end the Tory Government

Our campaign has consistently made the same demands of all political parties at local, regional, mayoral, national and EU elections: ring-fenced funding for specialist domestic and sexual violence and abuse services, predicated on an intersectional understanding of the gendered reality of male violence recognising the specific vulnerabilities of women with insecure immigration status, women living in more »

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In the News: women’s right to vote, elderly perpetrators, and CSA

A Woman’s Right to Vote via @womensaid When people learn that domestic abuse can deny a woman her right to vote, they can hardly believe it. But it’s true: the provisions for anonymous registration on the electoral roll exclude many domestic abuse survivors. With support, however, it is possible for some to exercise their democratic more »

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MEDIA REPORTING AND VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: WHY WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT THE NAVY

This blog is the second in a series in which Claire Simpson, PhD student at the University of Stirling discusses the results of her media monitoring project.  Over the next few weeks we will publish blogs from Claire where she takes in an in depth look at some of the results of her study.  You more »

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How Many More Women Like Alice Ruggles Have To Die Before We Learn Our Lesson? by Polly Neate

This morning, I appeared on Woman’s Hour, discussing the depiction of male violence against women in popular culture – notably Big Littles Lies, in which we are confronted with a complex and nuanced portrayal of an abusive relationship. But for centuries, I argued, we have been eroticising male violence against women – and this is more »

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News media still protect powerful men accused of sexual misconduct by Lindsey Blumell

When Fox News host Bill O’Reilly was finally fired after years of sexual harassment claims, it seemed like a welcome break from the norm: an exceptionally powerful man accused of sexual misconduct was for once not protected at all costs. While various harassment claims against Donald Trump failed to stop him in his path to more »

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Police told to ‘stop pushing responsibility’ for domestic violence prosecutions onto victims

Police forces are allowing perpetrators of domestic violence to escape justice by “pushing responsibility” for prosecutions on to victims, rather than building cases themselves, the police watchdog has warned. Officers need to “get on with their jobs” and track down evidence so they can pursue cases against offenders without relying on vulnerable victims to provide more »

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