Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

male violence

In the News: rape culture, male violence and victim blaming

Why do some UN peacekeepers rape?, by Azad Essa UN peacekeepers are sent to the most war-ravaged countries on Earth, ostensibly to help them transition to peace. But some stand accused of committing crimes against the very people they are supposed to protect. According to a recent investigation by the Associated Press (AP), between 2004 more »

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A week of male violence, by Kirsty Strickland

I OFTEN wonder what a feminist newspaper would look like. Not a newspaper for women, with a target audience of only women, but a traditional newspaper which boasted truly feminist credentials in terms of its structure, reporting and coverage. There would be obvious yet relatively minor differences. Women’s sport would be included on parity with more »

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Time to prioritise safety of mothers and children

DISCUSSIONS of child contact and court systems without mentioning domestic abuse are, I believe, akin to climate change policies that ignore human influence: ill-informed and reckless (“Parents deserve a court system that is fair but firm”, The Herald, August 28). The most recent figures suggest that domestic abuse is prevalent in at least half of more »

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Let’s stop romanticising the misguided, possibly dangerous actions of spurned men, by @sianushka

Stunts to win back ex-girlfriends reflect a culture that doesn’t respect women’s safety and autonomy, says Sian Norris On Saturday, the Bristol Post reported the story of how a 34-year-old man was intending to play one of the city’s public pianos in order to “win” back his ex girlfriend. Calling the woman who he’d been more »

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In the News: on Ian Watkins, ‘grooming’, and Rape Crisis Scotland

Rape Crisis Scotland express worry after sharp rise in number of sexual assaults reported, by Andrew Learmonth RAPE Crisis Scotland say they’re concerned at new Police Scotland figures showing a 46 per cent increase in the number of rapes against women over 16. A summary report to go in front of the Scottish Police Authority more »

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Michael Beck: Why labelling men who kill as ‘non-violen’t is irresponsible journalism

Every single week, 2 men in England and Wales make a choice to kill their current or former partner. Despite the fact that these men consistently have a history of domestic violence, the media insists on reporting comments from random neighbours claiming that these men are ‘caring fathers’, ‘loving brothers’, ‘quiet neighbours’,  and, as above, ‘non more »

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Why ‘upskirting’ needs to be made a sex crime, by Clare McGlynn & Erika Rackley

It started with one woman, Gina Martin, being prepared to put her head above the parapet and say: this is unacceptable and should clearly be a criminal offence. Martin was a victim of the practice known commonly as “upskirting” – the taking of a photo or video up a woman’s skirt without her permission. When more »

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Coercive control: How can you tell whether your partner is emotionally abusive?, by Radhika Sanghani

There is a growing awareness around the signs of coercive control – the emotional and psychological abuse of a partner, through threats and restrictions, as well as physical violence. This raised profile is thanks, in part, to last year’s storyline in The Archers – involving Helen Titchener and her emotionally abusive husband Rob. The BBC Radio 4 soap was following a new law on more »

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Blaming victims of male violence just reinforces the abuse, by @vonny_bravo

WHEN I think of how we respond to female victims, I think of the Victorians. Specifically of their approach to mourning, particularly in respect to women in the upper classes. When someone died – a parent, a husband a child – women partook in a complex set of rituals that dictated everything from their dress more »

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No, a woman being killed by her husband with a hammer is not an opportunity for a joke, by Marisa Bate

A 52-year-old man has been found guilty of bludgeoning his wife to death with a lump hammer when she refused to make him dinner. Jamal Khan told Preston Crown Court that when he asked his wife, Humera, who was sitting her at her sewing machine, if she had prepared him food, she replied, “Do it more »

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