Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

femicide

The reporting of India Chipchase’s murder shows the true extent of Britain’s rape culture by @sarahditum

What did the media see in her that made her the perfect victim? The grotesque answer is, the same things as the man who murdered her did. Why India Chipchase? For the Sun, it must have been the booze: “Woman ‘drank six Jagerbombs in ten minutes on the night she was raped and murdered” went the more »

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The erasure of Claire and Charlotte Hart by the media

This letter was written by Paula Cleary in response to an article by journalist Amy Collett in the Fenland Citizen. Cleary originally posted this letter on her Facebook page and has asked for it be shared widely to honour the lives of Claire and Charlotte Hart who were murdered on the 19th of July in more »

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Why violence against women in film is not the same as violence against men by Noah Berlatsky

Whenever you mention that a piece of art shows violence against women, you can be sure that the comments section will reply, with confused gusto, “What about the men?!” Men get shot in movies too, after all; why doesn’t anyone complain about that? Hurting men, the argument goes, should negate hurting women. As long as more »

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A cycle of violence: when a woman’s murder is called ‘understandable’ by Laura Bates

I can think of many words to describe the murder of a woman by her own husband. “Understandable” is not one of them. Yet this is the word that Dr Max Pemberton chose to use when he weighed in on Lance Hart’s recent murder of his wife, Claire, and their 19-year old-daughter, Charlotte. Writing in the more »

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Mass murderers have one thing in common – and it’s not a ‘women’s problem’ by @polblonde

Terror, it seems, often starts at home. Whether they are self-proclaimed jihadists or men with a grievance, a pattern is emerging among the mass killers whose murderous rages have claimed so many victims in recent times. A history of grudges against women and a record of domestic violence have been common factors in a number more »

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The context in which VAWG occurs

One of the most common refrains in the media when a man chooses to physically harm of kill is current or former partner is ‘it was an isolated incidents’. In the UK, we have 2 of these ‘isolated incidents’ a week – a statistic that does not include mothers, daughters, sisters, and grandmothers murdered by more »

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The murder of Jo Cox

Jo Cox, the Laboour MP for Batley and Spen, is the 57th woman to be murdered in the UK in 2016 by a male perpetrator. Whilst the police have yet to confirm the name of the perpetrator, named as Thomas Mair by the media, or eyewitness accounts of Mair shouting ‘Britain First’, what we do know is more »

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Men who kill partners likely to serve less time than those who kill strangers: study

This article by Colin Perkel was published on November 22, 2015 by CTV News   TORONTO — Men who kill their female partners are more likely to be criminally convicted than men accused of killing strangers — but they also tend to get lighter sentences, a Canadian study concludes. The research, being published in the more »

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Press make it clear women remain possessions of men – even in death.

Helen Nicoll, 53, was found dead over the weekend from a gunshot. Police are investigating and have arrested a 53 year old man. At this moment, no further details have been released officially. The media, however, have felt it necessary to refer to Nicoll as the possession of her husband.: Independent: Wife of Harley Street more »

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