Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

fatal male violence against women and girls

Invisible perpetrators, blameable victims: why is gendered violence still reported this way?

A “spurned lover” who punched his ex-girlfriend, a murderer who had “a sexual interest” in his victim and a “Tinder stabber” have all made headlines in the past week. All those headlines, which are sadly a common response to men’s violence against women, are also a revolting misuse of the power of mainstream media. A more »

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Michael Beck: Why labelling men who kill as ‘non-violen’t is irresponsible journalism

Every single week, 2 men in England and Wales make a choice to kill their current or former partner. Despite the fact that these men consistently have a history of domestic violence, the media insists on reporting comments from random neighbours claiming that these men are ‘caring fathers’, ‘loving brothers’, ‘quiet neighbours’,  and, as above, ‘non more »

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A woman and 2 children are murdered. The media reports about John Lennon’s former flat.

A woman and 2 children have been murdered in what the police are once again calling “a domestic incident” – as though murder were nothing more than an argument about whose turn it was to wash the dishes. The continuing inability of the police to be clear about the reality of male violence against women and more »

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How Many More Women Like Alice Ruggles Have To Die Before We Learn Our Lesson? by Polly Neate

This morning, I appeared on Woman’s Hour, discussing the depiction of male violence against women in popular culture – notably Big Littles Lies, in which we are confronted with a complex and nuanced portrayal of an abusive relationship. But for centuries, I argued, we have been eroticising male violence against women – and this is more »

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The Scottish Write to End Violence Against Women and Girls Award!

The Write to End Violence Against Women Awards Nominations close on Sept. 30! Violence against women is often in the news. Its prevalence in society makes it a ‘hot topic’ for reporters and its complex nature makes it an interesting issue for feature writers. However, the fact that violence against women is so complex can mean that more »

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A cycle of violence: when a woman’s murder is called ‘understandable’ by Laura Bates

I can think of many words to describe the murder of a woman by her own husband. “Understandable” is not one of them. Yet this is the word that Dr Max Pemberton chose to use when he weighed in on Lance Hart’s recent murder of his wife, Claire, and their 19-year old-daughter, Charlotte. Writing in the more »

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“Why doesn’t she just leave?” 5 subtle ways women are blamed for experiencing domestic abuse

This article is cross-posted with permission from writer Woman as Subject. Having worked with survivors of domestic abuse for many years, I am still shocked at the way in which society continues to blame women for the violence and abuse they suffer at the hands of men. This tendency to minimise or justify male violence more »

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Men who kill partners likely to serve less time than those who kill strangers: study

This article by Colin Perkel was published on November 22, 2015 by CTV News   TORONTO — Men who kill their female partners are more likely to be criminally convicted than men accused of killing strangers — but they also tend to get lighter sentences, a Canadian study concludes. The research, being published in the more »

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.@TheAge neglects some crucial information in headline: murder

Australian Andrew Klaussner, 40 has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for strangling partner  Elizabeth Barnes, 39, on September 26, 2013. You would not realize that Klaussner committed murder  from the original title and tweets used by The Age who went with this headline: Klaussner killed Barnes. He then left her body lying on more »

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