Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

criminal justice system

catalyst for change by @northern_thirty

How can we use investigations into Jimmy Savile and grooming gangs as a catalyst for change? Please watch   The book Not My Shame is available here. Download this post as PDF? Click here

, , , , , ,

Police told to ‘stop pushing responsibility’ for domestic violence prosecutions onto victims

Police forces are allowing perpetrators of domestic violence to escape justice by “pushing responsibility” for prosecutions on to victims, rather than building cases themselves, the police watchdog has warned. Officers need to “get on with their jobs” and track down evidence so they can pursue cases against offenders without relying on vulnerable victims to provide more »

, , , ,

In the News: domestic violence, rape culture and access to justice

This Missouri City Banishes Domestic Violence Survivors for Calling the Police by Sandra Park via @aclu In 2012, the city of Maplewood, Missouri ordered Rosetta Watson to vacate her home. But the city wasn’t done punishing Watson yet and also barred her from living anywhere in the city for six months. Her offense? She called more »

, , , ,

The reality of male violence against women and girls. (Or, why the legal system is not fit for purpose)

5 cases from 5 jurisdictions demonstrating how unfit for purpose most legal jurisdictions are in dealing with male violence against women and girls. Mustafa Bashir  received a suspended sentence for domestic violence that included physical assaults with a cricket bat and forcing his wife to drink bleach because his wife was deemed ‘not vulnerable’ by more »

, , , , ,

Mustafa Bashir given no jail time for forcing his wife to drink bleach.

UPDATE: Mustafa Bashir has now been sentenced to 18 months in jail for the crime of lying to the court about his cricket career using a “slip rule” which allows a judge to re-sentence a perpetrator if new information came to light. In this case. forcing a woman to drink bleach is less important than more »

, , , ,

Tortured and silenced.

i am a victim of rape violence and murder. I have had no voice, almost all my life my mum married my dad when she was very young, beaten almost daily. My sister and I arrived and we witnessed terrible violence, we lived in a nice house, had nice clothes to the outside world we more »

, , , ,

Should domestic abuse have its own law? by @sianushka

In the UK, there is no specific offence for ‘domestic violence’. Is the law failing women seeking justice? “When the police told me they wouldn’t charge my ex, I felt like there was no justice for women,” Naomi* explains. Like most survivors of domestic abuse, 31-year-old Naomi didn’t go to the police the first time more »

, , , ,

Theo and the distinctly sexual flavour of French racism by @KGuilaine

Content warning: contains detailed descriptions of sexual abuse On 2 February, a 22-year-old black French man named Theo was allegedly violently raped with a police truncheon, gang assaulted and racially abused by four French police officers in the Parisian suburb of Aulnay-sous-Bois. So severe were the anal injuries sustained by Theo that he needed major more »

, , , , ,

In the news – DV decriminalised in Russia and rape culture in British court rooms

Domestic violence reports soar in Russian city after partial decriminalisation by Rachel Roberts Reports of domestic violence have more than doubled in Russia’s fourth largest city since the Government reduced the punishmentfor spousal or child abuse from a criminal to a civil one. Police in Yekaterinburg responded to 350 incidents of domestic violence daily since the law was relaxed compared more »

, , , ,

It’s always high drama. It’s somebody’s life at stake’: inside British rape trials

…  Woodhouse is one of 12 volunteers working as observers on rape trials at Newcastle crown court. Nine women and three men, they are social workers, nurses, academics and counsellors, some retired, some not. Since January 2015, they have sat on 30 trials and made a string of recommendations: that barristers meet their clients before a more »

, , ,

‹ Previous Posts