Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

Consent

Survivors Voices

The importance of survivors voices and thinking about ‘dual roles’ (survivors who are professionals) The book Not My Shame is available here. Inspired by our participation with the Write to End Violence Against Women awards organised by Zero Tolerance, we are now collecting examples of good journalism about domestic and sexual violence and abuse to make it clear more »

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MEDIA REPORTING AND VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: WHY WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT THE NAVY

This blog is the second in a series in which Claire Simpson, PhD student at the University of Stirling discusses the results of her media monitoring project.  Over the next few weeks we will publish blogs from Claire where she takes in an in depth look at some of the results of her study.  You more »

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News media still protect powerful men accused of sexual misconduct by Lindsey Blumell

When Fox News host Bill O’Reilly was finally fired after years of sexual harassment claims, it seemed like a welcome break from the norm: an exceptionally powerful man accused of sexual misconduct was for once not protected at all costs. While various harassment claims against Donald Trump failed to stop him in his path to more »

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Contributory negligence

This news blog entry is by a former professional journalist who often expresses right-wing views. In this article, she makes it clear that she feels that a rape victim was partly responsible for the crime committed against her (“A woman who had been allowed to get very drunk inside Misty’s was dragged into bushes along more »

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It’s always high drama. It’s somebody’s life at stake’: inside British rape trials

…  Woodhouse is one of 12 volunteers working as observers on rape trials at Newcastle crown court. Nine women and three men, they are social workers, nurses, academics and counsellors, some retired, some not. Since January 2015, they have sat on 30 trials and made a string of recommendations: that barristers meet their clients before a more »

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Man arrested for racially-aggravated sexual assault. BBC headline gets confused with a carry-on film.

Due to the limited number of characters allowed by the BBC informal complaints, we have sent the following about the conviction of city lawyer Alistair Main:   Alistair Main has been convicted of one count of racially-aggravated assault and one of sexual assault. You minimise his criminal act of racialised sexual violence in your headline more »

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Challenging rape culture: boycott Poldark

Generally speaking, the representation of sexualised violence in television and film is frequently inappropriate, misleading and offensive. The exceptions to this rule are almost always due to the fact that the writers and directors have reached out to specialist service providers for support in ensuring that they represent reality – Eastenders work with Rape Crisis England/Wales more »

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The Ched Evans case shows why we must start talking about consent by @sianushka

There’s a lot to be said about the Ched Evans case: its cultural significance, the legal wrangling around using a woman’s sexual history as evidence, the impact it has had and could have on a woman’s willingness to report rape, the list goes on. But perhaps most importantly it revealed a lot about our attitudes more »

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