Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

Ched Evans

Transforming a Victim Blaming Culture

Media discussions of male violence against women focus on the actions of the victim rather than the perpetrator. How can we challenge this narrative using survivor’s testimony without putting them at risk of online harassment?   “If I was Ched Evans i would find that whore and actually rape her this time!!” This is one more »

, , , , , ,

The Ched Evans case shows why we must start talking about consent by @sianushka

There’s a lot to be said about the Ched Evans case: its cultural significance, the legal wrangling around using a woman’s sexual history as evidence, the impact it has had and could have on a woman’s willingness to report rape, the list goes on. But perhaps most importantly it revealed a lot about our attitudes more »

, , , , , ,

The Ched Evans case puts rape reform back 30 years by @rapecrisisscot

We were shocked and horrified to see the use of such blatantly prejudicial sexual history evidence in the Ched Evans retrial. Like Scotland, England and Wales has legislation in place to restrict defence lawyers using evidence of a rape complainer’s sexual history; however as with Scotland, the English/Welsh legislation does not ban the use of more »

, , , , , ,

We cannot allow the courts to judge rape by sexual history by @VeraBaird

The footballer Ched Evans had much to say following his rape acquittal, and the weekend newspapers gave him a platform to say it. Now rape campaigners must come to terms with the legacy of his case. By clearing the way for two men to tell the jury they’d had sex with the complainant, the court of more »

, , , , , ,

In the News: Ched Evans and Rape Culture

As with many organisations that work in the field of violence against women and girls, we have some quite serious concerns about the way in which the Ched Evans rape case has appeared in public. We have serious reservations about the legality of the website created by Evans’ family, the publication of CCTV footage of more »

, , ,

Patrick Kane: Another athlete under investigation for rape. This time it’s the Black Hawks fault.

Chicago Blackhawks player Patrick Kane is currently under investigation for rape. As we see with all athletes accused of violence against women and girls, as with Ray Rice, excuses are already being made for Kane. According to an article in the New York Times,  National Hockey League commissioner Gary Bettmen has already labeled the investigation “unfortunate”, proving that he more »

, , ,

Martin Daubney misses the point completely when talking about sexual harassment

Martin Daubney has written yet another one of his articles dismissing women’ experiences of sexual violence insinuating that sexual harassment is just women over-reacting. The arrogance and male entitlement in Daubney’s article is breathtaking; as is his clear lack of understanding of rape culture. Wolf-whistling is misogyny in action. It is not a compliment, nor more »

, , , , , , , , ,

Carol Malone: #NotNorman

cross-posted with permission from The Norman Awards Our latest #NotNorman goes to Carole Malone who wrote an article in the Mirror newspaper urging women to take responsibility for “their own safety”. As is the norm when anyone is just about to hold women responsible for a man’s choice to rape, she pays lip service to the civilised notion that women more »

, , , , , ,

Poor Gary Glitter was in a “bad place”

Gary Glitter breaks down in tears over child abuse images This is the BBC’s write-up of Glitter’s trial: Gary Glitter broke down in tears as he explained to jurors why he had been in possession of child abuse images. Sobbing uncontrollably, the 70-year-old said he had been in a bad place in his life, and more »

, , , , , , ,

‹ Previous Posts