Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

Rape Culture and “Twenty Minutes of Action” by Julian Vigo

Rape culture is a term coined by feminists in the 1970s which designates not only how females are vulnerable to sexual violence at the hands of males, but which speaks to the depth at which such violence is normalised. Quite often this term is met with ridicule in social media because for many, bitching about inequality is just part of the mantra of those women who refuse to be complicit, who refuse to STFU (shut the fuck up) and die in a fire as we are so often told to do on Twitter when we are not complicit subjects in the social use and production of our bodies and lives.

The actions of Brock Allen Turner epitomise the reality of assault by stranger which has recently been used to mock women online in social media and news comment section debates over the bathroom issue in the United States, as if the lower rate of stranger rape indicates that women should be unconcerned about the potential threat to their bodies at the hands of males. While sexual assault by stranger is the sort of scenario that most people still uniquely conceptualise as rape, this sort of assault is not uncommon accounting for 18% of all rapes. Still the problem of rape and how it is conceptualised, and more prevalently not conceptualised, within society as a major force of violence against women is rooted in its origins. ...

 

This article was first published by CounterPunch on 17.6.16. You can find the full text of the article here.

Inspired by our participation with the Write to End Violence Against Women awards organised by Zero Tolerance this year, we are now collecting examples of good journalism and writing about domestic and sexual violence and abuse.

Download this post as PDF? Click here Download PDF

, , ,

Comments are currently closed.