Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

Councils to be allowed to opt out of child protection laws, by Sara Ogilvie

When should an obligation not be obligatory? If the government has its way, it'll be whenever it relates to 80 years of essential child protections enshrined in UK law.

The Children and Social Work Bill has been working its way through the House of Lords with little fanfare. But among its proposals is a deeply worrying measure that not only shows a breath-taking contempt for democracy and the rule of law, but which could put vulnerable children across the country at serious risk of neglect and abuse.

Under the proposals, councils will be able to opt out of vital duties under almost every single law covering children's social care since 1933. This will affect more than eight decades of legislation, some of which was created in response to the most tragic cases of state failure like that of Victoria Climbié and Baby P.  ...

 

This article was first published by politics.co.uk on 30.9.16. You can find the full text of the article here.

Inspired by our participation with the Write to End Violence Against Women awards organised by Zero Tolerance, we are now collecting examples of good journalism about domestic and sexual violence and abuse to make it clear that it is possible to write about DSVA without resorting to myths, misrepresentations, minimisation and victim blaming.

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