Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

News

Theo and the distinctly sexual flavour of French racism by @KGuilaine

Content warning: contains detailed descriptions of sexual abuse On 2 February, a 22-year-old black French man named Theo was allegedly violently raped with a police truncheon, gang assaulted and racially abused by four French police officers in the Parisian suburb of Aulnay-sous-Bois. So severe were the anal injuries sustained by Theo that he needed major more »

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No, wives ‘withholding sex’ are not to blame for male violence by Laura Bates

Wives who don’t have enough sex with their husbands are partly to blame for men committing sexual assault, according to an articlepublished by the Daily Mail. The writer, Dr Catherine Hakim, claims that “decent” husbands whose wives “starve” them of sex are driven to affairs and “forced to seek relief elsewhere”, resulting in “a profoundly negative more »

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It’s always high drama. It’s somebody’s life at stake’: inside British rape trials

…  Woodhouse is one of 12 volunteers working as observers on rape trials at Newcastle crown court. Nine women and three men, they are social workers, nurses, academics and counsellors, some retired, some not. Since January 2015, they have sat on 30 trials and made a string of recommendations: that barristers meet their clients before a more »

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A man who didn’t talk to his wife would not be funny. He would be an abuser by Lola Okolosie

Since in 2016 turning on the news invariably resulted in a rush of negativity, it’s fair to say that by 31 December we were all fed up with the prevailing sense of doom. This perhaps explains why a story – the authenticity of which has been questioned – about a Japanese husband who didn’t speak more »

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‘All day, everyday’: where is the protection against violence in schools and universities?

Women all over the world have used human rights law, whether domestic or in the international treaties, to challenge their Governments when they were not recognizing and respecting women’s human rights. Women lawyers have over decades used the core human rights treaties creatively to show governments that women’s bodies, freedom and dignity are as entitled more »

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When a Man Kills a Woman by @K_IngalaSmith at openDemocracy

Across everything that divides societies, we share in common that men’s violence against women is normalised, tolerated, justified – and hidden in plain sight. … Men’s fatal violence against women in the UK crosses boundaries of class, race, nationality and age.  Over the last year, the oldest woman killed was 85, 18 were over 60, more »

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Men’s intrusion: rethinking street harassment by Fiona Vera-Gray

To capture the impact of ‘street harassment’ on women’s sense of self, we may need to rethink our language to better fit the lived experience. … Attention to women’s experiences of intrusive men in public space is having something of a resurgence. Traditionally one of the most understudied yet commonly experienced forms of violence against women, more »

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What will it take to end honour based violence in the UK? by Hannana Siddiqui

… Contrary to its due diligence obligations under CEDAW  and the Istanbul Convention  (when ratified), the government’s violence against women strategy advocates a ‘whole family’ or ‘troubled families’ approach which loses its primary focus of protecting victims and holding perpetrators to account. It is also woefully inadequate in meeting the challenges of the collective nature of domestic violence/HBV where more »

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In the news: coercive control and rape culture

Stanford Sexual Assault Case Survivor Emily Doe Speaks Out via @glamourmag  … From the beginning, I was told I was a best case scenario. I had forensic evidence, sober un­biased witnesses, a slurred voice mail, police at the scene. I had everything, and I was still told it was not a slam dunk. I thought, more »

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Challenging rape culture: boycott Poldark

Generally speaking, the representation of sexualised violence in television and film is frequently inappropriate, misleading and offensive. The exceptions to this rule are almost always due to the fact that the writers and directors have reached out to specialist service providers for support in ensuring that they represent reality – Eastenders work with Rape Crisis England/Wales more »

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