Everyday Victim Blaming

challenging institutional disbelief around domestic & sexual violence and abuse

October, 2014

We need a nuanced discussion of rape culture

(originally published in the Huffington Post) We need a nuanced discussion of rape culture: just as every single person who has stepped up to defend Judy Finnigan’s theory that Ched Evans wasn’t a violent rapisthas demanded this week. We need to discuss why convicted rapist Ched Evans is currently in talks, from prison, about a potential more »

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What if she were your mother? Your daughter?

We see this comment a lot in reference to the victim blaming of victims of sexual and domestic violence and abuse: What if she were your daughter? Your mother? Your sister? Your aunt? We understand the desire to make the reality of victim blaming clear to those perpetuating damaging myths about sexual and domestic violence more »

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Responding to Rape Apologism in Women

This week we have seen a number of high-profile women supporting convicted rapist Ched Evans by suggesting the rape he committed was not violent (Judy Finnigan) and that we need nuance (Sarah Vine). We have also a large number of women using social media to defend Evans. We understand the temptation to respond to these more »

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Rape Culture in Action: A Response to a Comment

Normally, we simply hit the spam button when we receive similar comments to the one below. This one, however, manages to insert a number of rape myths into 3 short sentences. We have redacted the name of the woman from the post. We know it will be easy to guess who the post refers to more »

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John Grisham: Viewing Images of Abused Children isn’t Abuse

John Grisham, the famous crime writer, has been condemned today for his comments  regarding sentences for men who view images of child abuse. Just to be clear – it is not ‘child p0rn’ – the latter word implies consent. These are images of child abuse. [Just so you know, I have to spell p0rn that way more »

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Barnardos is accused of blaming a victim for their sexual abuse

This is a major headline today with a number of media outlets covering the story. We are not surprised to learn that an employee of the children’s charity Barnardos wrote a letter in 1993 to survivor of child sexual exploitation, abuse and rape hold them responsible for the abuse. Victim blaming culture is endemic – more »

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Why doesn’t she just leave?

Imagine if instead of saying “why doesn’t she leave him?” we said “why doesn’t he leave her?” Imagine if we thought that men who control, threaten and manipulate women are responsible for their actions and that they should be the ones to leave. Imagine if wondering why she puts up with it, we wonder why he does it in the first place. Imagine if, more »

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Why @SarahVine Is Wrong About Rape & Saying So Is Not “Monstering”

(cross-posted from Incarnationalrelational) I am all for nuance in debate and discussion – nuance can and should serve to provide richer and deeper understandings when exploring an idea, a situation, a problem. Nuance is good. In the last couple of days there has been much reaction to Judy Finnigan’s comments about the footballer Ched Evans case on more »

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